COVID-19 personal and perceived stigma as predictors of autonomy and relatedness need satisfaction in Hong Kong’s university students

Main Article Content

Y. P. M. Ling
T. L. Chan
H. Y. A. Liu
Y. T. Lam
S. R. B. Yue
T. C. Lam
Dr. Phoenix Kit-han MO

Abstract

Introduction


Under self-determination theory, need satisfaction leads to psychological well-being, whereas their frustration leads to ill-being. This research explores COVID-19 personal and perceived stigma as predictors of autonomy and relatedness need satisfaction in Hong Kong university students. Personal stigma refers to one’s attitudes and treatment of a stigmatized group. Perceived stigma refers to what one believes are their community’s attitudes and treatment of the same.


Significance


The unprecedented nature of COVID-19 makes it unclear how existing theory translates to COVID-19 stigma. Our research addresses this by showing COVID-19 perceived stigma predicts worsened relatedness satisfaction, which opens implications of its effects on psychological well-being.


Methods


102 university students in Hong Kong recruited in November to answer an online questionnaire. Inclusion criteria include being students in a higher education institution in Hong Kong, at least 18 years of age, residency in Hong Kong, and no prior history of mental illness.


Results


High COVID-19 perceived stigma is associated with worse sense of relatedness adjusted for after adjusting for confounders (β=-1.17, p=0.017). COVID-19 fear is associated with both increased COVID-19 personal stigma (β=1.26, p<0.001) and perceived stigma (β=0.70, p-value=0.009). Personally, knowing someone who was diagnosed with COVID-19 has no association with either decreased COVID-19 personal stigma (β=0.99, p-value=0.355) or perceived stigma (β=0.65, p=0.387).


Conclusion


COVID-19 perceived stigma warrants attention as a predictor of decreased relatedness need satisfaction. Consistent with existing theory on health-related stigma, fear is a factor associated with increased COVID-19 stigma, and should be considered as a target for stigma-reduction interventions.

Article Details

How to Cite
Ling, Y. P. M. ., Chan, T. L., Liu, H. Y. A., Lam, Y. T., Yue, S. R. B., Lam, T. C. and Mo, P. K. H. (2021) “COVID-19 personal and perceived stigma as predictors of autonomy and relatedness need satisfaction in Hong Kong’s university students”, Journal of Asian Medical Students’ Association. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9, p. 5. Available at: https://jamsa.amsa-international.org/index.php/main/article/view/219 (Accessed: 10May2021).
Section
Scientific Posters

References

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